3rd Gen Toyota Tundra Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a new Toyota Tundra 2023. Before that I had and drove a Mitsubishi L200 and Toyota Cand Cruiser 300. The problem is when I drive in 2H the car behaves very well, steers well and there are no problems in turns. But as soon as I switch from 2H to 4H, the behavior of the car immediately changes and when turning or when parking the car, it seems that something is holding my wheels. When the steering wheel is twisted by 80%, the car drives very hard forward and backward. as if the wheel rested on the body of the car. Who can tell what it is. Perhaps there is a setting for this. The car is only 4 days old since I took it from the dealer and this problem was from the very beginning when I took the car from the dealer.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Based on what you have presented knowledge of the four wheel drive system appears to be the issue. The Tundras have a true 4x4 system. A negative to some and a positive to others. Some trucks and most all SUV have an all time 4x4, or auto setting for 4x4. These systems allow slippage of the front and rear drive lines through viscous coupling or whatever. These systems when turning sharp (such as into parking lots)(front and tear tires turning on a different radius) drive smoothly. As the wheels at the front and rear axle are not traveling the same distance while in a turn. That difference in travel has to be evened out somewhere and the drive systems allow the slippage to occur within the drive system. The Tundra's,( all of them) do not have this system and get dinged by journalist when comparing different trucks. These auto type of system allows those less engaged in the driving of their vehicle to drive a 4x4 and they also work best for car based systems, the majority of drivers are happier with them.

The Tundra's have a true 4x4 system. There is no slip between the front and rear axle when 4x4 is engaged and your owner manuel will tell you to only to engage 4x4 when on surfaces that have slip, ice, snow, dirt, sand, not asphalt. As the tire at their contact patch are what is having to slip as the front and rear tires are not traveling the same distance. Going straight down a road you will not notice any issue in 4x4 as all four tires are travling the same distance. As I see you are from Canada I will assume you are driving in a snow covered parking lot. And you are feeling front wheel hop as you turn into a parking spot.

This wheel hop is probably also not allowing you to smoothly pull into the parking lot as the truck would not turn as sharply as you planned. You would never want to do this on a solid surface. So to resolve your issue you can put the truck into 4x2 when needing to make sharp turns. OR when needing to make sharp turns on snow covered roads while in 4x4 make the radius of the turn as wide as possible when in 4x4 and make driving adjustments to accommodate for the trucks front tires slipping causing a wider turn than you expected. To most off-road enthusiast this is a better and stronger system and thus why Toyota sticks with it in their truck designed to haul and tow loads.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top